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Göran Kropp 8000 plus David Lagercrantz

Göran Kropp 8000 plus

David Lagercrantz

Published
ISBN :
Paperback
255 pages
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 About the Book 

Why just climb Everest when you can climb it without supplemental oxygen? Why just climb it without oxygen when you can climb it alone? And why fly to Nepal to climb Everest when you can bicycle all the way there? Apparently, questions such as theseMoreWhy just climb Everest when you can climb it without supplemental oxygen? Why just climb it without oxygen when you can climb it alone? And why fly to Nepal to climb Everest when you can bicycle all the way there? Apparently, questions such as these occurred to Göran Kropp, a Swede with a taste for adventure and a desire for the Ultimate High. In October 1995, Kropp set out from Sweden with a bicycle, a trailer, and over 200 pounds of equipment. Over the next four months, he cycled some 7,000 miles across Eastern Europe, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, and Nepal. By the time he arrived in Kathmandu, Kropp had been shot at, pelted with rocks, and offered the madams daughter--free of charge--in a Hungarian brothel. After carrying his own equipment up to Everest Base Camp, Kropp found himself surrounded by other climbers, all waiting for a break in the weather so they could attempt the summit. Many books have been written about that disastrous season on Everest, notably Jon Krakauers Into Thin Air and Anatoli Boukreevs The Climb. Kroop adds little of substance to the story, engaging mainly in camp gossip about who was sleeping with whom and outing climbers who lied about reaching summits. Even Kropps account of his own climb is somewhat suspenseless--though some readers will be relieved that he doesnt go into too much detail about his physical breakdown. More tiresome is Kropps clear disdain for climbers who use supplemental oxygen. (Mount Everest is not 29,028 feet tall if the mountain is scaled by a climber wearing an oxygen mask.) He also despises climbers who see Everest and other high peaks reduced to trophies kept in a china cabinet--though his Ultimate Mountain List (hes already climbed 16 of the 22) seems a bit like a trophy room itself.After he finally reached the summit--on his third attempt in under a month--Kropp spent a few weeks recuperating in Kathmandu and then hopped on his bike for the long and rugged ride home. Not satisfied, Kropp is already planning and training for his next adventure, to take place in 2004: sailing from Sweden to Antarctica, skiing to the South Pole, and returning--all solo. That he is only just learning to sail doesnt dissuade him--I like to jump headfirst into new projects. Ultimate High is proof that hes determined--and crazy--enough to complete them. --Sunny Delaney